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Literacy

literacyliteracy

Literacy skills are important because:

  • They are pivotal for all learning in every curriculum area.
  • They are essential for independent learning, the world of work and most other aspects of everyday life.
  • They enable a child to communicate effectively, develop confidence and to have a healthy self-esteem.

 

Aims

 We aim to encourage all children to:

  • Develop the necessary skills to use the English language confidently, appropriately and accurately to the best of their ability.
  • Speak confidently with intonation, clear diction, accurate grammar and style with regard for the listener.
  • Listen attentively with understanding, pleasure and empathy and to process the information and retain aurally as much detail as they are able.
  • Read a range of materials fluently and with good comprehension for enjoyment and for information.
  • Write effectively for a range of audiences and purposes using spelling, punctuation and syntax accurately and confidently.
  • Present work using neat legible handwriting. 

The above aims are consistent with the requirements of the National Curriculum for Key Stage One and Key Stage Two. They take into account the aims of the National Literacy Strategy which identifies the fundamental skills of speaking and listening, reading and writing under the categories Word Level, Sentence Level and Text Level work.

Strategies for the teaching of Literacy

We are currently following the National Literacy Strategy, which will be adapted where relevant to the needs of the children.

The Foundation Stage endeavours to cover all aspects of the Communication Language and Literacy area of early learning goals throughout the year.  Greater structure will be added towards the end of the Reception year to prepare the children for the National Literacy Strategy and the National Curriculum.

 

The Literacy Curriculum is organised into:

  •  Formal learning of reading, writing, speaking and listening in periods distinctly allocated to this work.
  • Informal learning which goes on throughout the school day and throughout all curriculum areas. It should be noted that equal importance is given to both these aspects of the Literacy curriculum and that opportunities are sought to engage the children in cross-curricular links.

Literacy is taught through a balance of different teaching methods. Pupils will be given opportunities to learn through real experiences, practical tasks, through focussed analysis of written text, published learning material, teacher-prepared materials, educational visits, ICT and tasks set to complete at home.